W O R K .

About

Markus Wernli

Markus WERNLI is an artist, researcher, and teacher, dedicated to socially integrative, ecologically engaged practice. He is investigating the formative dynamics and relationships in our World of Eaters, where all life forms are eating what is feeding on them—thereby learning to cultivate homemaking capabilities for interexistent flourishing.
He worked most recently for Dutch Design Week (Eindhoven), Rooftop Farm at Hong Kong University, Utopiana Gardens (Genève), Campus Garden at Australian National University (Canberra), Wooferten Activist Residency (Hong Kong), Le Ville Matte (Sardinia), Seoul Art Festival, Cheng-Long Wetlands Environmental Art Project (Taiwan), and Anyang Public Art Project (Seoul).
Markus taught at Zokei School of Art in Kyoto (2005-07), College of Asia and the Pacific at Australian National University in Canberra (2012-14), and School of Design at Hong Kong Polytechnic University (2015-18). He is the recipient of an Internationalization Grant from Creative Industries Netherlands in Rotterdam (2016), and a Seed Grant from Design Trust in Hong Kong (2017).

Contact

mswernli@gmail.com

Curriculum Vitæ

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Portfolio

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Research Praxis

U P C O M I N G . E N G A G E M E N T S

Spring 2019: Thesis defense of ‘Adventurous Homemaking’ (Hong Kong).

Spring-summer 2019: Preliminary exploration for ‘Edible Margins’ (Hong Kong).

C U R R E N T L Y . R E A D I N G

Tim Ingold (2017). Anthropology and/as Education.

Nicholas Christakis (2019). Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society.

Douglas Rushkoff (2019). Team Human.

Shiu-Ying Hu (2005). Food Plants of China.

Frans de Waal (2019). Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us about Ourselves.

Jacques Derrida (2002). The Animal That Therefore I Am.

Donna Haraway (2016). Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene.

Ch. Alexander, S. Ishikawa, M. Silverstein (1977). A Pattern Language.

Robert Sapolsky (2017). Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst.

Kurt Koffka (1935). Principles of Gestalt Psychology.

R E C E N T L Y . R E A D

Charles Mann (2018). The Wizard and the Prophet.

Melanie DuPuis (2015). Dangerous Digestion: The Politics of American Dietary Advice.

Kimmerer LaMothe (2015). Why We Dance: A Philosophy of Bodily Becoming.

Livia Kohn (2008). Chinese Healing Exercises: The Tradition of Daoyin

Sandor Katz (2003). Wild Fermentation: A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Cultural Manipulation.

Tim Barber (2014). The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food.

David Waltner-Toews (2013). The Origin of Faeces: What Excrement Tells Us About Evolution, Ecology, and Society.

Jane Bennett (2010). Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things.

Michael Carolan (2016). The Sociology of Food and Agriculture.

Sharon Hayes (2010). Radical Homemakers: Reclaiming Domesticity From A Consumer Culture.

Arturo Escobar (2018). Designs for the Pluriverse: Radical Interdependence, Autonomy, and the Making of Worlds.

Tony Fry (2018). Remaking Cities: An Introduction to Urban Metrofitting.

Ramia Mazé (2007). Occupying Time: Design, Technology, and the Form of Interaction.

Amanda Ravetz, Helen Felcey, Alice Kettle (2013). Collaboration through Craft.

Tim Ingold (2011). Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description.

Tim Ingold and Elisabeth Hallam (2014). Making and Growing: Anthropological Studies of Organisms and Artefacts.

John Dewey (1938). Experience and Education.

Judith Halberstam (2011). The Queer Art of Failure.

Salomon Friedländer (1918). Schöpferische Indifferenz.

Mikael Sonne and Jan Tønnesvang (2015). Integrative Gestalt Practice: Transforming Our Ways of Working with People.

Joseph Zinker (1977). Creative Process in Gestalt Therapy.